Volume 4, Issue 2, June 2020, Page: 38-43
Craniosynostosis – A Case Series and a Brief Review of Literature
Sibhi Ganapathy, Manipal Institute of Neurological Disorders (MIND), Bangalore, India
Swaroop Gopal, Institute of Neurosciences, Sakra World Hospital, Bangalore, India
Received: May 16, 2020;       Accepted: May 29, 2020;       Published: Jun. 28, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.cnn.20200402.14      View  14      Downloads  11
Abstract
Introduction: Craniosynostosis is an uncommon disorder affecting the growing skull. Timely surgery and physical therapy can give excellent results restoring neurological function and cosmesis. However, miss the appropriate juncture, and severe consequences will follow. Concerns include late presentation, surgical morbidity. Case Series: We present our institutional experience of varied syndromes who presented to a tertiary care institution between 2016 and 2018 along with the course in hospital complete with surgery and rehabilitation. We also supplement this with a short review of literature. The article stresses on the need to differentiate syndromic and simple craniosynostosis as well as in their specific management strategies complete with procedure assessment and complications. Result: A series of syndromic and simple craniosynostosis operated early lead to optimal cosmetic results with minimal or no long-term neurological deficits. The approach emphasises the need for early treatment to ensure excellent cosmesis and to avoid neurological and developmental disorders.
Keywords
Craniosynostosis, Strip Craniotomy, Suture Excision
To cite this article
Sibhi Ganapathy, Swaroop Gopal, Craniosynostosis – A Case Series and a Brief Review of Literature, Clinical Neurology and Neuroscience. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2020, pp. 38-43. doi: 10.11648/j.cnn.20200402.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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