Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2020, Page: 11-17
Hemorrhagic Breakdown of the Cerebral Bridge: A Report of 5 Observations at Lomé Teaching Hospital, Togo
Komi Assogba, Neurology Department, Campus University Teaching Hospital, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo
Michel Faustin Tassa-Kayem, Neurology Department, Campus University Teaching Hospital, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo
Kossivi Martin Apetse, Neurology Department, Campus University Teaching Hospital, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo
Damelan Kombate, Neurology Department, Campus University Teaching Hospital, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo
Jean Joel Tajeuna Dongmo, Neurology Department, Campus University Teaching Hospital, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo
Josué Euberma Diatewa, Neurology Department, Campus University Teaching Hospital, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo
Komi Agbotsou, Neurology Department, Campus University Teaching Hospital, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo
Abdullah Blakime, Neurology Department, Campus University Teaching Hospital, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo
Veronique Afiwa Agbobli, Pychology Unit, Campus University Teaching Hospital, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo
Kolou Dassa, Pychology Unit, Campus University Teaching Hospital, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo
Koffi Agnon Ayélola Balogou, Neurology Department, Campus University Teaching Hospital, University of Lomé, Lomé, Togo
Received: Feb. 13, 2019;       Accepted: Jul. 4, 2019;       Published: Feb. 10, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.cnn.20200401.13      View  117      Downloads  28
Abstract
Introduction: Intracerebral hemorrhage is a major public health problem in Africa. The care is well codified in developed nations but the medical outcome and the technical platform remains a thorny challenge in African countries. It is responsible for a heavy handicap and a high mortality. The corpus callosum is an anatomical structure that connects the two cerebral hemispheres and control neuropsychological behavior. The objective was to determine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of hematomas located in the corpus callosum. Clinical presentation: The stuy was carried out in the neurlogical department of the big tertiary hospital of the country. The study had reported five cases of hematoma of the corpus callosum. That has represented 0.3% of hemorrhagic strokes in the service. The average age was 33.4 years old with four females. Clinical symptoms in the acute phase were dominated by speech disorders, intracranial hypertension and meningeal signs. In the subacute phase, all patients had neuropsychological symptoms. These disorders included aphasia, left tactile anomia, ideomotor and diagonostic apraxia, and mood and behavior disorders in two-third of cases. The brain scan was performed with an average delay of 6 days. In the cerebral scan, the posterior part of the corpus callosum was the initial seat of the hematomas observed in all cases. Cerebrovascular risk factors were high blood pressure in all cases and alcoholism in two cases. The factor of poor prognosis was the association with meningeal contamination. The evolution was favorable in all five cases. Conclusion: This work brings out that hematoma of the corpus callosum is rare but still a serious disease with a misleading semiology dominated by neuropsychological disorders. The early management is the best practice to preserve functional autonomy.
Keywords
Brain Hematoma, Corpus Callosum, Neuropsychological Disorders, Africa
To cite this article
Komi Assogba, Michel Faustin Tassa-Kayem, Kossivi Martin Apetse, Damelan Kombate, Jean Joel Tajeuna Dongmo, Josué Euberma Diatewa, Komi Agbotsou, Abdullah Blakime, Veronique Afiwa Agbobli, Kolou Dassa, Koffi Agnon Ayélola Balogou, Hemorrhagic Breakdown of the Cerebral Bridge: A Report of 5 Observations at Lomé Teaching Hospital, Togo, Clinical Neurology and Neuroscience. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2020, pp. 11-17. doi: 10.11648/j.cnn.20200401.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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