Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2020, Page: 1-4
A Case of VACTERL Association Complicated with Multiple Rib Abnormalities
Zeng Zhiguo, Department of Orthopedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Jinan, China
Zhang Guowei, Department of Orthopedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Jinan, China
Ji Zhisheng, Department of Orthopedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Jinan, China
Yang Yuhao, Department of Orthopedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Jinan, China
Yang Hua, Department of Orthopedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Jinan, China
Lin Hongsheng, Department of Orthopedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Jinan, China
Received: Dec. 17, 2019;       Accepted: Dec. 27, 2019;       Published: Feb. 4, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.cnn.20200401.11      View  115      Downloads  49
Abstract
VACTERL association is an acronym that includes vertebral anomalies (V), anal atresia (A), cardiac defects (C), tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) or esophageal atresia (EA), renal anomalies (R), and limb defects (L). Rib abnormalities have rarely been reported with the VACTERL association. The second case of VACTERL association complicated with multiple rib abnormalities will be reported in this case report. A 4-year-old girl who had been diagnosed with congenital cardiovascular disease and received surgical corrections soon after birth consulted our institution by complaining congenital scoliosis. The little girl was diagnosed with VACTERL association (congenital cardiovascular disease, scoliosis with hemivertebra and butterfly vertebra, and nephrolithiasis) and congenital multiple rib abnormalities. The Cobb angle of the main curve was 29.3° before surgery, 19.9° after surgery, and 23° at last follow-up. Multiple rib abnormalities may be seen in the VACTERL association. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion when evaluating patients with rib abnormalities associated with VACTERL. It is extremely necessary for careful physical examination and detailed auxiliary examination to each system (including echocardiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and so on) when diagnosing VACTERL association. Also, recognizing and understanding the congenital multiple system malformation is important, which aids in the diagnosis of disease and accordingly plan the therapeutic interventions. Early diagnosis of congenital scoliosis with appropriate surgical intervention decreases long-term morbidity.
Keywords
VACTERL Association, Rare Diseases, Rib Abnormalities
To cite this article
Zeng Zhiguo, Zhang Guowei, Ji Zhisheng, Yang Yuhao, Yang Hua, Lin Hongsheng, A Case of VACTERL Association Complicated with Multiple Rib Abnormalities, Clinical Neurology and Neuroscience. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2020, pp. 1-4. doi: 10.11648/j.cnn.20200401.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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