Volume 2, Issue 1, March 2018, Page: 9-11
Skin Picking in Individuals with Intellectual DisabilitySkin Picking in Individuals with Intellectual Disability
Allison Cowan, Department of Psychiatry, Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State University, Dayton, USA
Jason Lee, Department of Psychiatry, Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State University, Dayton, USA
Received: Aug. 5, 2017;       Accepted: Nov. 20, 2017;       Published: Jan. 9, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.cnn.20180201.12      View  1088      Downloads  50
Abstract
Individuals with Intellectual Disability seek treatment from primary care physicians, neurologists, and psychiatrists for excoriation disorder, a disorder described as the picking of ones’ skin resulting in sores. There is a significant financial and emotional cost to people with this disorder. There is a lack of research in the area of co-occurring ID/D and excoriation disorder. This case series seeks to fill a gap in the literature by describing three distinct, successful treatments of excoriation disorder in individuals with intellectual disability.
Keywords
Excoriation Disorder, Intellectual Disability, Co-Occurring Mental Illness in ID/D, Skin-Picking Disorder in ID/D
To cite this article
Allison Cowan, Jason Lee, Skin Picking in Individuals with Intellectual DisabilitySkin Picking in Individuals with Intellectual Disability, Clinical Neurology and Neuroscience. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2018, pp. 9-11. doi: 10.11648/j.cnn.20180201.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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